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Free range

Take and eat. Love is feeding her pizza while watching the tide come in at the Cairns foreshore.

My endo is going to be pleased with me, at last.

Four years since diagnosis, I think that maintaining close to normal blood sugars for a T1D is for, umm, well, others.

After four years with a dud pancreas, fifteen thousand blood sugar checks and six thousand injections, I have come to believe that higher than normal blood sugar is not the bogeyman, that fat damages protein 23 times more than glucose does, that glycation damage can be reversed, that insulin is implicated in causing retinopathy, that glucagon, not insulin, is the master hormone, that insulin makes me fat, that the body doesn’t need insulin to uptake blood glucose, and that high carb in the form of fructose is regenerative.

As I said before, my body feels much better with higher blood glucose.

Time for a new n=1 experiment.

I’ve stopped injecting Novorapid (fast acting insulin) before meals and snacks.

I inject 9 units of Levemir (long acting insulin) at night, and 5 in the morning. That’s enough to keep gluconeogenesis within bounds.

Today is Day Three.

Day One after breakfast, the spike was briefly up to 14 mmol/L (250 mg/dl). I withstood the impulse to inject. At 10 am it was around 6 mmol/L (110 mg/dl). I had a cup of coffee with sugar and milk, and by noon it was 5.4 mmol/L (97 mg/dl) and crashing.

That will do me.

A similar pattern occurred in the afternoon and evening, with much flatter spikes. Day Two was similar.

Fasting sugar this morning – Day Three – was 5.7 mmol/L with a flatline Libre during the night.

This is on a high carb (fructose), moderate protein, low fat vegetarian diet. Apart from the one or two spoonfuls of liver I occasionally crave.

No more hypos, no more anxiety about hypos, no more waking up every hour and a half to check sugar, no more nightmares!

Five less injections every day.

What’s not to like?

Welcome to free range sugar.

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